Not Logged In Log In   Sign Up   Points Leaders
Follow Us    5:08 AM

Recent Gas News/GasBuddy Blog

11
votes
pump to homepage help
How technology could help prevent kids' deaths in hot cars

CBS News -- The news is always tragic, and seems to happen far too often: a child left in a hot car is found dead of heat stroke when a caregiver forgot or did not know they were there.

"It could happen to anyone. This is not a bad parenting problem," laments Kristy Arbogast, the lead author of a 2012 National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) report on technologies to prevent heat stroke for children in hot cars. She is the co-scientific director of the Center for Injury Research an Prevention at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

A car's temperature can rise rapidly in the hot sun -- topping 120 degrees inside, on an 80 degree day -- and children should never be left alone in a parked car, not even for a minute.

Could a smart car seat or some other technology help harried, distracte  (go to article)

Submitted a moment ago By:
1 Comments
Not Newsworthy
11
votes
pump to homepage help
The Dodge Grand Caravan is dead, long live the Grand Caravan

Detroit News -- I’ve lived a sheltered life. Yes, I admit it. I had never driven a minivan.

I grew up in the back of my Mom’s Pontiac station wagon. My own cars have ranged from pocket rockets to sports cars. And when our rug rats ruled our carpets, Mrs. Payne banned the mom-ivan from our auto shopping list. Indeed, my sporty mate is a walking demographic study of why minivan sales have faltered in recent years. She finds them frumpy, square, uncool.

So when I got a taste of a Dodge Grand Caravan recently, I naturally rebelled. The forbidden fruit. I loved it.

Maybe it’s the fact that the Caravan has as much third row legroom as the second row of a Caddy ATS (we XL types love that). Maybe it’s the dozens of terrifying, tire-squalling, turns-on-two-wheels laps I’ve taken in Ford Econoline vans at Barber  (go to article)

Submitted 43 minutes ago By:
6 Comments
Not Newsworthy
14
votes
pump to homepage help
CRUZ: ‘Fahrenheit 451’ Democrats

Washington Times -- 45 Democrats in the U.S. Senate are supporting a constitutional amendment to repeal the free-speech provisions of the First Amendment and give Congress power to regulate political speech.

It’s all because a group of conservative filmmakers made a documentary film in 2008 about then-Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton that did not speak favorably about her record. Senate Democrats are now supporting a constitutional amendment from Sen. Udall of New Mexico to stop Americans from showing movies like the one Citizens United created during the 2008 election.

Senate Democrats are willing to rewrite the Constitution to take away the right of Americans to speak or create art that is critical of politicians.

Never before has Congress tampered with the First Amendment.
 (go to article)

Submitted 1 hour ago By:
23 Comments
Not Newsworthy
23
votes
pump to homepage help
Mercedes Benz to upstage Rolls Royce with $1 million S-Class Pullman

GasBuddy Blog -- If you're ready to invest $1 million for your next car, this may be the way to go.  The Mercedes-Benz S-Class Pullman will have three rows and cost as much as double the top-of-the-line Rolls-Royce, setting it up to become the world’s most expensive sedan when it goes on sale next year. Priced at about $1 million with armor plating, Bloomberg News says the vehicle will be reminiscent of past Mercedes models owned by the likes of John Lennon, designer Coco Chanel and former Philippine leader Ferdinand Marcos. The four rear seats will face each other and be separated from a front chauffeur compartment by a partition window to guarantee discretion, according to a person familiar with details of the brand’s strategy....  (go to article)

Submitted 2 hours ago By:
PD
301 Comments
Not Newsworthy
25
votes
pump to homepage help
Lawmakers hit the gas to save highway fund Read more: http://thehill.com/policy/transportation/infr

The Hill -- A sense of urgency took hold in the Capitol on Tuesday, as lawmakers ramped up work on legislation to prevent states from suffering a 28 percent cut in transportation funding next month.

But even with the burst of activity, top tax writers in both the House and the Senate stopped short of saying they had a deal that would avert sidelining thousands of construction workers in the heat of an election year.

House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Dave Camp (R-Mich.) pushed a short-term fix for the Highway Trust Fund and said his committee would consider a measure on Thursday that would finance projects through next May.  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
36 Comments
Not Newsworthy
26
votes
pump to homepage help
Crude oil will head north of the border to Canada

The Washington Times-Delays on Keystone pipeline benefit Canada -- While Congress and the White House have been fighting over whether to build the Keystone XL pipeline so the U.S. can import more oil from Canada, U.S. energy companies have quietly turned that debate on its head and are now exporting growing amounts of oil to Canada.

Canada has ironically become the biggest beneficiary of a gusher of premium crude coming out of shale oil wells in America’s Midwest. Moreover, the question of what to do with the U.S. oil glut has — as least for the time being — trumped concerns about how and whether to secure a steady stream of crude from Canada for decades to come through its proposed pipeline.

In a sign of how the debate has subtly shifted this year, even as the Obama administration has resisted growing pressure to make a decision on the Keystone issue..  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
40 Comments
Not Newsworthy
32
votes
pump to homepage help
Shale oil and gas gives the U.S. more leverage around the world

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette -- Since midpoint in the last decade, America’s shale-energy balance sheet has grown ever more positive. The abundance today of shale-enabled oil and natural gas defines many places where investment and economic activity had once been scarce. Just look at Pennsylvania, North Dakota, Texas and many other states.

But there’s another benefit — albeit one which few Americans easily discern: The shale revolution is generating national security and geopolitical assets, real-world consequences moving more sharply into focus in recent weeks.

Just the potential for sizable U.S. energy exports gives pause to petro-dictators and expansionist bullies, forcing Russian President Vladimir Putin, for example, to downscale his ambitions.

Central Europe’s game of power poker these days rests not on tanks...  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
40 Comments
Not Newsworthy
30
votes
pump to homepage help
The Climate Optimists

Slate -- Conservatives have a new line on climate change: “It’s real, but it’s nothing to worry about!”

[...]

It’s tempting to find irony in the spectacle of hundreds of climate change deniers staging their convention [in Las Vegas] amid a drought of historic proportions. But, as the conference organizers are quick to tell you, they aren’t actually climate change deniers. The majority of this year’s speakers readily acknowledge that the climate is changing. Some­ will even concede that human emissions are playing a role. They just think the solutions are likely to be far worse than the problem.

“I don’t think anybody in this room denies climate change,” the Heartland Institute’s James M. Taylor said in his opening remarks Monday.  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
30 Comments
Not Newsworthy
34
votes
pump to homepage help
CHEVRON APOLOGIZES FOR PREMIUM GAS DRIVER SAYS RUINED CAR'S ENGINE

KTRK-TV (ABC 13 in Houston) -- There's an update on the problems with Chevron premium gasoline. We told you one Tomball man was afraid to drive his truck after the company suddenly stopped selling premium; now another driver says his car's engine was ruined by the gas. In an Eyewitness News exclusive, Chevron is now promising to make things right.

The signs were still on some gas stations on Wednesday told telling the stations cannot sell premium or mid-grade fuel, and while Chevron has not said what's wrong with the gas, one driver tells us it ruined his cars engine.

This is not Jamal Caliste's Subaru, his car is in the shop with a ruined engine.

"He said there was something in the gas that totaled my engine," said Caliste.
 (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
39 Comments
Not Newsworthy
23
votes
pump to homepage help
LOOKING FOR MID OR PREMIUM-GRADE GAS? WON'T FIND IT AT ALL CHEVRON GAS STATIONS

KTRK-TV (ABC 13 in Houston) -- When you pay for premium gasoline, you expect it to be the best at the station, but that's not what some Chevron customers are saying after they paid for the high-price fuel.

Instead of premium or even mid-grade gasoline, this sign greets customers saying the stations can not sell it -- but not until some filled up and now they want to know what's wrong with the fuel.

Marshal Carpenter has a truck with a full tank of gas but he's afraid to drive it.

"Should I drive my vehicle? Should I not," asked the Tomball resident.

Carpenter says he became concerned last week after finding several Chevron gas stations unable to sell supreme or mid-grade fuel. Instead, he found only signs that did not explain the reason the fuels were off the market.
 (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
21 Comments
Not Newsworthy
25
votes
pump to homepage help
Minivans are too practical to have the reputation they have

Automotive News -- If all vehicles represent compromises to necessity, I would argue that minivans are the least compromised of any segment. They comfortably and safely haul people or cargo and they do so very efficiently compared to large crossovers, SUVs or pickups.

Minivans provide nearly unparalleled interior creature comforts and access within the cabin, superior visibility for the driver, and are relatively safe compared to similar vehicles. Their biggest weakness -- even a ‘mini’ van is exceedingly large as a one-person commuter -- is shared with every other vehicle that could be described as a people-hauler.

Yet so many people view minivans like a socially awkward class valedictorian -- a best friend when you need help with your chemistry project, an embarrassing social pariah when you don’t.  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
28 Comments
Not Newsworthy
40
votes
pump to homepage help
Gas prices could drop up to 25 cents by August

19kytx -- USA TODAY- Gasoline prices could fall up to 25 cents a gallon in parts of the USA within the next two weeks, thanks to slumping crude oil prices, weakening demand and robust supplies.

Now averaging $3.64 a gallon - vs $3.48 last July -prices could soon drop to $3.50, with some Southern states falling below $3, says Patrick DeHaan, senior petroleum analyst for price tracker gasbuddy.com.

Crude oil prices are down again Wednesday, with benchmark West Texas crude off$$1.22 to $102.18 a barrel and Brent crude off 67 cents to $108.27 - a ninth straight daily drop.

"The tipping points were cooling tensions in Iraq and Hurricane Arthur come and being no big deal,'' says DeHaan. "Oil bulls had no where to go, and oil prices are higher than they should be and unjustified at this level."

With Ir  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
208 Comments
Not Newsworthy
36
votes
pump to homepage help
Van Carrying Several People Crashes Into White Oak Bayou in Texas

abc30.com -- HOUSTON -- A group of workers are recovering at the hospital after their van crashed into the White Oak Bayou off the North Freeway at Cavalcade. The men, two with severe injuries, were forced to jump onto the roof of their van as Houston Firefighters used a boat to rescue them.

Video from Skyeye HD showed several people sitting on top of the van which was about halfway down in the water.

Houston Police said around 7am, a witness saw the driver of the van headed southbound on the North Freeway then exit Calvacade at a high rate of speed. Police say the driver swerved to miss traffic, hit the median then went airborne and took a nose dive into the bayou. The van landed on its tires, floating in the water.

Houston fire officials said six of the passengers were able to get on the roof...  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
273 Comments
Not Newsworthy
35
votes
pump to homepage help
Oil on 2-week slide even with Mideast turmoil

ap -- Wholesale gasoline fell 3.5 cents to close at $2.938 a gallon.
EW YORK — The price of oil fell for the ninth straight day Wednesday as global supplies continue to flow despite unrest in the world’s most important oil-producing region.

The prolonged drop could lead to lower gasoline prices for U.S. drivers in the weeks ahead.

In the Middle East, the insurgency in Iraq is far from resolved, but hasn’t halted oil exports. The fighting now seems unlikely to spread to Iraq’s major oil fields. Tensions between Israel and Hamas have escalated in the past week, but aren’t threatening any major oil production.

On the supply side, Libyan crude exports appear poised to surge after an agreement between the government and local militias cleared the way for export terminals to open. And U.S. product  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
136 Comments
Not Newsworthy
37
votes
pump to homepage help
Now’s Your Chance to Snag Your Very Own Harrier Hover Plane

Wired -- If you’ve always wanted to own a hover plane but aren’t actually in the military, here’s your chance. A Harrier jump jet goes up for auction later this month, and it won’t take much to get it flying again.

The Harrier, developed by the British in the 1960s and later embraced by Marine Corps, is best known for its ability to hover like a helicopter. The jet’s engine pumps air through four nozzles, which rotate to propel the plane forward or straight up. That allows for very short takeoffs and vertical landings, so the plane doesn’t need a long runway to operate. It’s among the coolest, most ingenious aircraft ever designed. It’s also a bitch to fly.

The plane in question, serial number XZ132, was built in 1976 by Hawker Siddeley for the British Royal Air Force.  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
528 Comments
Not Newsworthy
40
votes
pump to homepage help
Power grab: EPA wants to garnish wages of polluters

The Washington Times -- The Environmental Protection Agency has quietly floated a rule claiming authority to bypass the courts and unilaterally garnish paychecks of those accused of violating its rules, a power currently used by agencies such as the Internal Revenue Service.

The EPA has been flexing its regulatory muscle under President Obama, collecting more fines each year and hitting individuals with costly penalties for violating environmental rules, including recently slapping a $75,000 fine on Wyoming homeowner Andy Johnson for building a pond on his rural property. SEE ALSO: EDITORIAL: The EPA’s outrage in the barnyard “The EPA has a history of overreaching its authority. It seems like once again the EPA is trying to take power it doesn’t have away from American citizens,” Sen. John Barrasso, Wyomin  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
573 Comments
Not Newsworthy
14
votes
pump to homepage help
Why oil price not higher

Bloomberg -- Oil prices should be higher with all of the political activity.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
9 Comments
Not Newsworthy
15
votes
pump to homepage help
GM to recall 28,789 Saab cars for safety defect

GREENWICH TIME -- — General Motors is recalling 28,789 Saab convertibles because the driver's seat belt retractor can break.

The recall involves vehicles from the 2004-2011 model years.

GM says if the retractor breaks, the seat belt will immediately loosen and won't work properly. That increases the risk of an injury in an accident.

The company isn't aware of any injuries related to the issue. GM will contact owners and dealers will replace the seat belt retractors for free.

GM owned Saab at the time many of the vehicles were made. It sold the brand in 2010................  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
15 Comments
Not Newsworthy
15
votes
pump to homepage help
U.S. overtakes Saudi Arabia, Russia to become world’s biggest oil producer: report

Grant Smith, Bloomberg News -- The U.S. overtook Saudi Arabia and Russia to become the world’s biggest producer of oil as extraction of energy from shale rock strengthens the nation’s economy, Bank of America Corp. said.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
21 Comments
Not Newsworthy
15
votes
pump to homepage help
Keystone XL pipeline route legally drawn, Nebraska tells court

Bloomberg News -- The Keystone XL pipeline’s proposed route through Nebraska was legally drawn, lawyers for the state told its Supreme Court in defending legislation, struck down by a state judge, that gave the job to the governor and the conduit’s builder.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
10 Comments
Not Newsworthy
21
votes
pump to homepage help
Russians beat us to Holy Grail of drone pizza delivery

ECN -- We won the Cold War and Space Race for this?

We’ve discussed drones, the attendant privacy issues, and their commercial potential exhaustively, but a recent event serves as a cruel mockery of the freedoms we cherish. While the Federal Aviation Administration, politicians, and privacy advocates continue to squabble over domestic drone regulations, Russia — not exactly a pillar of individual liberty — allowed a local pizza joint to deliver a hot pie from the air.
 (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
14 Comments
Not Newsworthy
29
votes
pump to homepage help
Climate science denier group must pay damages for frivolous lawsuit against UVA, scientist

Southernstudies.org -- "There is a larger context for this latest development," Mann wrote on his Facebook page at the time he filed the defamation suit, "namely the onslaught of dishonest and libelous attacks that climate scientists have endured for years by dishonest front groups seeking to discredit the case for concern over climate change."  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
27 Comments
Not Newsworthy
23
votes
pump to homepage help
Fix the Climate Problem? Easy. Cut U.S. Emissions to 1901 Levels

Bloomberg news -- The study contains detailed sections on each of a dozen large national emitters, including the U.S., China, Russia and the U.K. It suggests to national leaders that cutting carbon may be possible, without economic compromise and without fear that they’ll have to go it alone. Such analysis might help them generate the political support they’ll need to make the UN climate negotiations in Paris at the end of 2015 successful.

So the good news, according to the two organizations that wrote the report, is that cutting U.S. emissions 85 percent below 1990 levels by 2050 is “technically feasible.” That’s a drop of more than 5.4 gigatons of carbon dioxide pollution in 2010 to 746 megatons in 2050, according to the study.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
23 Comments
Not Newsworthy
18
votes
pump to homepage help
Shale Seen Shifting Flows at America’s Biggest Oil Port

Bloomberg Businessweek -- For more than 30 years, the Louisiana Offshore Oil Port LLC has been a symbol of U.S. dependence on foreign oil, pumping Nigerian and Saudi Arabian crude from the world’s biggest supertankers into underground storage caverns beneath the marshes of southern Louisiana.

Now, with domestic production at a 28-year high, LOOP’s managers are thinking the previously unthinkable: They want to reverse the flows and send North American oil out as well as take foreign oil in.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
11 Comments
Not Newsworthy
22
votes
pump to homepage help
Now a Canadian Tar Sands Pipeline Threatens Endangered Whales

Takepart.com -- That's what environmentalists are arguing as they fight energy giant Kinder Morgan's proposed expansion of a $5.4 billon pipeline that would carry tar sands oil to a coastal terminal in Vancouver to be shipped overseas. The number of oil tankers traversing the feeding grounds of endangered whales—such as the blue whale, the North Pacific right whale, and the Southern resident whale—would jump 600 percent, according to estimates by environmental groups.

The fear: As more huge tankers ply the marine mammals' habitat, the risk of oil spills and whale deaths from ship collisions will rise.

Last Friday, Living Oceans and EcoJustice, First Nation tribes, and Canadian municipalities filed motions with Canada's National Energy Board seeking a temporary halt to the 18-month review...  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
10 Comments
Not Newsworthy
21
votes
pump to homepage help
Dodge Charges into Its 100th Year

Product Design & Development -- The Dodge brand is tearing into its centennial year as America's mainstream performance brand, celebrating its 100th anniversary on July 1, 2014. With the purification of the brand and consolidation with SRT, Dodge is getting back to its performance roots with every single model it offers. The consolidated Dodge and SRT brands will offer a complete lineup of performance vehicles that stand out within their own segments. Dodge is the "mainstream performance" brand within the Chrysler showroom. SRT is positioned as the "ultimate performance" halo of the Dodge brand, together creating a complete and balanced performance brand with one vision and one voice.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
16 Comments
Not Newsworthy
19
votes
pump to homepage help
WTI Slips for Ninth Day After Supplies Advance at Cushing

bloomberg.com -- West Texas Intermediate oil fell for a ninth day, the longest stretch of declines since 2009, after supplies rose at Cushing, Oklahoma, the contract’s delivery point. Gasoline slipped to a one-month low.

Cushing stockpiles rose by 447,000 barrels to 20.9 million last week, Energy Information Administration data showed. Gasoline inventories increased 579,000 barrels to 214.3 million as demand slipped. Brent fell to a one-month low amid signs Libyan oil exports will gain.

“I was expecting to see Cushing supplies sink, so the build caught me a bit by surprise,” said Tom Finlon, Jupiter, Florida-based director of Energy Analytics Group LLC. “The Libyans appear to be making progress and are taking a pragmatic approach about returning their oil to the market.”

WTI for August delivery dropped  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
17 Comments
Not Newsworthy
26
votes
pump to homepage help
What happens when there’s no money to repair our highways

Yahoo Finance -- The federal gasoline tax hasn't changed for 21 years, and remains at 18.4 cents a gallon (24.4 for diesel).

President Obama said last week if Congress doesn't act, states will have to choose between which highway projects to continue and which ones to shut down, putting as many as 700,000 jobs at risk. "That would be like Congress threatening to lay off the entire population of Denver, or Seattle, or Boston," said Obama, standing beside the Key Bridge, one of five bridges that connects Washington, DC to Virginia and is used by more than 100,000 commuters daily.

Valliere says there could be "a little patch" applied to the Highway Trust Fund that maintains it through Election Day but after that "a bigger problem still looms."  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
28 Comments
Not Newsworthy
19
votes
pump to homepage help
What do Americans Think About Federal Tax Options to Support Public Transit, Highways, and Local Str

SJSU -- The survey results show that a majority of Americans would support higher taxes for transportation—under certain conditions. For example, a gas tax increase of 10¢ per gallon to improve road maintenance was supported by 69 percent of respondents, whereas support levels dropped to just 25 percent if the revenues were to be used more generally to maintain and improve the transportation system. For tax options where the revenues were to be spent for undefined transportation purposes, support levels varied considerably by what kind of tax would be imposed, with a sales tax much more popular than either a gas tax increase or a new mileage tax.
With respect to public transit, the survey results show that most people want good public transit service in their state. In addition, nearly two-thirds  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
14 Comments
Not Newsworthy
19
votes
pump to homepage help
Local car dealers on hiring spree amid booming sales

Winsor Star -- Local car dealers are expanding stores and hunting for workers as they gear up for booming car sales that are expected to break another record this year.

“We are in a constant state of growth,” said Fred Francis, spokesman for the Rafih Auto Group, which owns 12 dealerships in Windsor and Essex County.

The company is seeking 30 additional employees, including sales and administrative staff, licensed technicians and service advisers, said Francis.

In a bid to lure more sales staff, Rafih Auto Group recently changed its compensation policy from one based largely on commission to a guaranteed annual salary, plus commission and benefits, said Francis.

“We’re not seeing too many young people or recent grads wanting to get into this line of work. Our focus groups told us that one concern  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
10 Comments
Not Newsworthy
18
votes
pump to homepage help
Harley-Davidson recalling 66,421 motorcycles for safety defect

Associated Press --
DETROIT - Harley-Davidson is recalling 66,421 Touring and CVO Touring motorcycles from the 2014 model year because their front wheels can lock up without warning.

Motorcycles with anti-lock brakes built between July 1, 2013, and May 7, 2014, are included in the recall.

Harley-Davidson Inc. says the front brake line can get pinched between the fuel tank and the frame. That could cause front brake fluid pressure to increase, increasing the risk that the front wheel could lock up while riding.

The company knows of five crashes and two minor injuries related to the defect, which it discovered last fall through warranty claims.

Harley-Davidson will notify owners later this month. Dealers will replace the brake lines for free and attach straps to hold them in place.
 (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
24 Comments
Not Newsworthy
18
votes
pump to homepage help
House’s $10 Billion Highway-Fund Boost Shows Split Congress

Bloomberg News -- A proposal late yesterday for a $10 billion infusion to the U.S. Highway Trust Fund highlights divisions in Congress over how to replenish the main source of federal money for state road, bridge and mass-transit projects.

The plan by House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Dave Camp, a Michigan Republican, would offset its costs by letting employers delay contributions to their employee pension plans, which raises corporate taxable income in a boon for the U.S. Treasury. It also would boost customs user fees and transfer $1 billion from a federal leaking underground storage trust fund.

The proposal diverges from a plan in the Senate, complicating the ability to forestall a slowdown in disbursements from the highway trust to states next month.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
14 Comments
Not Newsworthy
16
votes
pump to homepage help
America’s Energy Addiction: Where It Comes From, Where It Goes

Wall st cheat sheet -- America’s Energy Addiction: Where It Comes From, Where It Goes

SAM BECKER | MORE ARTICLES
JULY 09, 2014
Page 1 of 3view all

David McNew/Getty Images
America is addicted to energy. We drill miles under the ocean, run nation-length pipelines, and even fight wars just to get our fix. Our reliance on cheap fuel sources has also helped bring untold prosperity to the United States, helping power businesses and residential dwellings, and also supplying everyone with ample power to properly heat and cool their homes. There is also plenty of oil power the millions of vehicles, not to mention ships, airplanes, and everything other method of transport we have been able to come up with.

Since the United States depends so largely upon energy, we have been able to find several different sources from  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
5 Comments
Not Newsworthy
22
votes
pump to homepage help
Council axes red light cameras

Press Enterprise -- Riverside, California will turn off its red light cameras in two months, ending an eight-year program that lost money most of those years and, by some accounts, aggravated a majority of residents.

After several years of contentious public debate, the council on Tuesday voted 5-2 to cancel the contract with Redflex Traffic Systems...

Dumping the program will wipe out about $450,000 in revenue that was anticipated in this year's budget.

“I think the will of the people should take precedence over the desires of the bureaucracy,” Councilman Chris Mac Arthur said. “It’s time once and for all to terminate this.”

Riverside’s red light camera program started in late 2006 and includes 18 cameras at 15 intersections, though four are not in use due to road construction.
 (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
21 Comments
Not Newsworthy
18
votes
pump to homepage help
Toronto's Aerovelo aims to build world's fastest bike

Canadian Press -- Team already known for winning human-powered helicopter $250K prize that went unclaimed for 33 yrs

Headed by two U of Toronto alumni, the team is currently working on a bicycle that can go faster than the current world record of 83.14mph

The aerodynamics of the vehicle — a recumbent bicycle encased in a slick bullet-shaped shell — are different from the helicopter, the choices of materials and manufacturing processes are similar

Cycling is still the most efficient way to harness the human body. Not only does it make use of the powerful leg muscles, it also holds a unique advantage over other propulsion methods

The project will cost $120K from donations and sponsorship

The team raised $30K through crowdfunding

A functional vehicle is expected to be completed by the end of the month  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
6 Comments
Not Newsworthy
26
votes
pump to homepage help
Fortune 100 companies saved $1.1B using renewable energy

IT World -- Clean energy is no longer just the bastion of crunchy granola types and companies hoping to improve their public image.

Increasing the use of renewable energy has become a targeted goal of almost half of Fortune 500 companies, and with good reason. According to a new report, more than half of Fortune 100 companies collectively saved $1.1 billion in energy costs by rolling out renewable energy programs.
 (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
11 Comments
Not Newsworthy
20
votes
pump to homepage help
Rep. Pascrell Calls for Robust Transportation Funding

The Paramus Post -- Today, U.S. Rep. Bill Pascrell, Jr. (D-NJ-09), a member of the House Ways and Means and Budget Committees, called for more robust transportation funding ahead of tomorrow’s Ways and Means markup of a $10.5 billion, eight-month transportation funding extension. The proposal, which was released this afternoon, would push the debate over road and transit spending into the next Congress.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
5 Comments
Not Newsworthy
19
votes
pump to homepage help
Harley-Davidson Recalling 66,421 Motorcycles

AP -- Harley-Davidson recalling 66,421 motorcycles
Associated Press
28 minutes ago

DETROIT (AP) — Harley-Davidson is recalling 66,421 Touring and CVO Touring motorcycles from the 2014 model year because their front wheels can lock up without warning.

Motorcycles with anti-lock brakes built between July 1, 2013, and May 7, 2014, are included in the recall.

Harley-Davidson Inc. says the front brake line can get pinched between the fuel tank and the frame. That could cause front brake fluid pressure to increase, increasing the risk that the front wheel could lock up while riding.

The company knows of five crashes and two minor injuries related to the defect, which it discovered last fall through warranty claims.

Harley-Davidson will notify owners later this month. Dealers will replace the br  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
9 Comments
Not Newsworthy
24
votes
pump to homepage help
General Motors Recalls 8 Million Vehicles in One Day

Carcomplaints.com -- By David A. Wood

June 30, 2014 — General Motors is recalling over 8 million vehicles in separate recalls taking in models going back to 1997. GM said it's aware of three fatalities, eight injuries and seven crashes, all related to ignition keys that move out of the "run" position. However, GM says there is no "conclusive evidence" the ignition defect caused those crashes.

GM didn't release much information about the recalls, other than to say the huge number of recalled vehicles is all part of GM's "most comprehensive safety review in the history of our company because nothing is more important than the safety of our customers."

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration hasn't released any information about when the recalls will begin or what repairs GM will make to...  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
14 Comments
Not Newsworthy
19
votes
pump to homepage help
Under Sanction Threat, Russia Turns To Own, Chinese Oil Technology

RigZone -- MOSCOW/LONDON, July 9 (Reuters) - With President Vladimir Putin watching from afar, the head of Rosneft, Igor Sechin, launched the world's biggest oil drilling platform in the Okhotsk Sea to warm handshakes with his colleagues from ExxonMobil.

Beamed live to the Kremlin on June 27, the event marked a major step in fulfilling the president's goal of increasing oil output, and the presence of U.S. executives seemed to support Putin's argument that Western sanctions were not hurting.

But partly built in South Korea, the more than 200,000 tonne Berkut platform at the Sakhalin-1 project, led by Exxon, also highlighted the oil industry's dependence on foreign technology - something Washington could target if it decides to step up sanctions on Russia over its actions in Ukraine.
 (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
9 Comments
Not Newsworthy
32
votes
pump to homepage help
Does America need more oil refineries?

GasBuddy Blog -- Image From ..ogj.comDo we have enough oil refineries?  Enough refining capacity?  The answers often depend not only on whom you ask but when. If  it’s springtime when refineries are wrestling with annual maintenance checks and balances and the often bumpy transition from ‘winter-blend’ to ‘summer-blend’ that boils our blood... many of us may be inclined to say that a few more refineries might ease bottlenecks and price spikes particularly in some regions where fuel supply logistics and options are nonexistent or extremely limited.   (Sure, build those refineries, they’ll say… almost anywhere, except the Gulf Coast that already has nearly 50% of the nation’s refining capacity.)  What do you say?...  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
PD
1080 Comments
Not Newsworthy
24
votes
pump to homepage help
Ford wrings mileage out of three-cylinder Fiesta

ap -- There's a new little secret under the hoods of some 2014 Ford Fiesta small cars.

Added as an optional selection for Fiesta buyers during the model year, a new, three-cylinder, gasoline engine with turbocharger is so fuel thrifty, it makes the Fiesta the top gasoline-powered 2014 sedan in fuel mileage in the United States.

In fact, the 2014 Fiesta four door with SE EcoBoost package has government fuel economy ratings as high as those for some diesel-powered sedans from BMW, Audi and Volkswagen. Specifically, the 2014 Fiesta sedan with the three-cylinder, EcoBoost engine is rated at 31 miles per gallon in city driving and 43 mpg on highways for a combined average of 36 mpg.

The numbers aren't farfetched. The test Fiesta sedan with the little engine averaged 34 mpg even when the driver was  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
10 Comments
Not Newsworthy
22
votes
pump to homepage help
Republicans Have Unveiled Their Solution To The 'Highway Shutdown,' And Conservatives Already Hate I

business insider -- The House Ways and Means Committee unveiled its plan to shore up the Highway Trust Fund, providing a proposed solution to what many on Capitol Hill view as Congress' next big looming crisis.

The House Republican plan, which was given a thrust of public support by House Speaker John Boehner on Wednesday, would provide federal financing for federal construction projects through next May. The plan would be financed through unusual offsetting, revenue-generating measures such as a method known as "pension smoothing" and various customs user fees.

The proposal is viewed as an early step toward an eventual congressional deal. A Senate committee spearheaded by Democrats is expected to introduce its own plan on Wednesday.

Lawmakers have warned that the Highway Trust Fund, which helps support  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
6 Comments
Not Newsworthy
17
votes
pump to homepage help
Wanna Bet? Setting the Odds for Future Speed

Car and Driver -- If there is one thing we enjoy more at C/D than driving, it would be arguing. Over everything. From the “right” number of digits after a decimal point, to the correct spelling of “donut,” to where we should go for doughnuts. We argue about cars, too, with many such automotive debates taking the form of prognostication. The less high-minded might call it “gambling out of spite.” Here you’ll find 20 of these predictions-in-dispute with the favorites handicapped. Our stated odds are valid through 2020, or until we all decide that the people who came up with this list are crazy or idiots or crazy idiots...

 (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
4 Comments
Not Newsworthy
16
votes
pump to homepage help
Daimler demonstrates its driverless big rig on the Autobahn

Yahoo! Autos -- In the ‘70s classic movie, “Duel,” a seemingly driverless tanker truck terrorizes an innocent salesperson driving to his next call along a remote stretch of highway. Could a driverless big rig – minus the stalkerish behavior – be part of our future?

Daimler Trucks thinks so. In fact, it’s betting big on it and showed its ante with the introduction of its Future Truck 2025 earlier today in Germany. Using the truckmaker’s Highway Pilot system, the prototype semi-truck is capable of driving itself while hauling a full load at speeds exceeding 50 mph, according to the company.

“The truck of the future is a Mercedes-Benz that drives itself.” Dr. Wolfgang Bernhard, the member of Daimler’s Board of Management responsible for Daimler Trucks and Buses, at the debut of the truck earlier today.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
5 Comments
Not Newsworthy
19
votes
pump to homepage help
Flanagan South Oil Pipeline Line Fill Seen Pushed to Early Q4

Reuters -- Construction of the 600,000-barrel-per-day Flanagan South oil pipeline from Illinois to Oklahoma will be complete late in the third quarter, with the first oil flowing early in the fourth quarter, operator Enbridge Inc said.

The new timeline for commissioning the nearly 600-mile conduit is later than generally expected, delaying the delivery of another large slug of Canadian crude to refiners along the U.S. Gulf Coast. The arrival of that heavy oil is expected to further diminish imports from supplies like Mexico and Venezuela.

"The majority of construction is complete on the 593-mile Flanagan South pipeline project, and work continues on the seven pump stations," company spokeswoman Kristen Higgins said in an email late on Tuesday.

"With this remaining pump station work - and the time  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
7 Comments
Not Newsworthy
19
votes
pump to homepage help
Court: Cops can't stop drivers based on the color of their cars

Justin Hyde | Motoramic -- "Probable cause" has long been one of those terms that made the jump from legal jargon to household term, especially with regards to drivers who get pulled over. The struggle over what that allows on American roads — and what it doesn't — took a new turn last week with a Florida ruling that threw out a conviction stemming from a police officer who found something wrong with the color of a car.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
24 Comments
Not Newsworthy
17
votes
pump to homepage help
ecall Roundup: Subaru, Chrysler Recall Nearly 1.2 Million Vehicles Combined over Brake Line, Ignitio

J.D. Power and Associates -- During the past week, Subaru recalled more than 660,000 vehicles over concerns about corroded brake lines, while Chrysler recalled more than 525,000 vehicles due to an ignition switch defect. Details are below, in alphabetical order by manufacturer.

 (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
8 Comments
Not Newsworthy
17
votes
pump to homepage help
Teens don't do one simple thing that could save their lives!

Autoblog -- Hindsight being what it is, I now realize that I was a certifiable moron as a teenager. I thought I was far smarter and slicker than I actually was, and I took part in a spectacular array of things that, when viewed through the wiser eyes of someone pushing 30, were the height of stupidity. I'm sure most average Joes and Janes have a similar view of their adolescence. Throughout my teen years, though, I did do one thing correctly – I always wore my seatbelt.

Weirdly, that's a topic that today's teenagers have issue with. And no, this isn't just some rant about youth; there's empirical evidence to back up this troubling trend. A new report by the Governors' Highway Safety Association has revealed that of the teen drivers killed on the roads in 2012, over half (51.2 percent, to be precise)  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
14 Comments
Not Newsworthy
16
votes
pump to homepage help
Students set to create Le Mans race car capable of crushing Nurburgring record

Motoramic -- Designing and creating an experimental race car destined for Garage 56 at the 24 Hours of Le Mans is typically reserved for your bigwig engineers who have experience building some of the world's fastest machines. Usually those mighty-minds get bored by regulation restraints and set out to build something revolutionary – like in recent years, the Delta Wing and Nissan ZEOD RC.

This is the InMotion IM01, a hybrid experimental race car hoping to debut at Le Mans in 2017, and in the same breath, crush the long-standing 6 minute 11 second lap record at the fabled Nurburgring. Only this isn't designed by ex-F1 boffins, or a bored Adrian Newey. It's the creation of a bunch of Dutch students.

Birthed from the minds of those studying at the Technical University of Einhoven and Fontys University o  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
8 Comments
Not Newsworthy
21
votes
pump to homepage help
Shale boom confounds forecasts as U.S. set to pass Russia, Saudi Arabia

Reuters -- Four years into the shale revolution, the U.S. is on track to pass Russia and Saudi Arabia as the world's largest producer of crude oil, most analysts agree. When that happens and by how much, though, has produced disparate estimates that depend on uncertain factors ranging from progress in drilling technology to the availability of financing and the price of oil itself.

 (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
25 Comments
Not Newsworthy